REVIEWS

Arts Your Case StrongFit Silicon case for iPhone 5/5S

Fugoo Style Bluetooth Speakers

LG G Flex on Rogers

Red Clock app for iPhone weather and alarm

ASUS ZenBook UX310

Dyson DC62 Hand-Held Vacuum

Pelican ProGear CE1150 Protector Series case for iPhone 5/5s

Philips AirFryer

Samsung Galaxy TabPRO 8.4

ASUS VivoPC

Alcatel OneTouch Idol X

Nomad ChargeKey for iPhone

Apple Mac Pro (2013)

Kensington Comercio soft folio case for iPad Air

Olympus OM-D E-M1 Micro Four Thirds camera

Jawbone UP24 Fitness Tracker

Dell Venue 8 Pro's wireless keyboard and case

ASUS MeMO Pad 8

Logitech Ultrathin Bluetooth keyboard for Apple's iPad Air

2013 GMC Terrain

Honeywell HFD320 AirGenius 5 Air Cleaner & Odor Reducer

Dell Venue 8 Pro Tablet

TomTom US & Canada App for Android

Withings Pulse fitness tracker

Sonos PLAY:1 wireless streaming speaker

Martian Passport series smartwatch

Nextivity Cel-Fi RS2 Signal Strength booster

HTC Desire (2013)

Motorola Moto G

iPad mini with Retina Display

Nexus 5

Microsoft Surface 2

Tenqa Fit Bluetooth Earbuds for Sports

HTC One mini

Apple iPad Air

Sony Xperia Z1

BlackBerry Z30

TYLT VU Wireless Charging Stand

Keizus Quadropod + Clamp

Sphero 2.0

Chromecast

Griffin Technology WoodTone Headphones

Samsung Galaxy Note 3

Philips Saeco Poemia Espresso Machine

Nokia Lumia 1020

Huawei Ascend Mate

LG G2

Samsung Galaxy Mega

Apple 5c Case

Apple 5s Case

Apple iPhone 5s

Apple iPhone 5c

Apple Airport Extreme (2013)

Nexus 7 (2013)

Ultimate Ears Boom Bluetooth speaker and handsfree

2013 Inifiniti FX37 Crossover

Moto X

Sony Xperia Z

Huawei Ascend Y300 on Bell and Virgin

TIMEX Intelligent Quartz Linear Indicator Chronograph watch

BlackBerry Q5

MIO Alpha Heart Rate Monitor

Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 8-inch Android Tablet

Apple MacBook Air 13-inch (2013)

Chevrolet Sonic RS Turbo

Sensu Brush

Huawei Ascend Y210 

Apple 27-inch iMac

Dyson DC46 Turbinehead Canister Vacuum

BlackBerry Q10

Rogers LTE Rocket Hub ZTE MF2 28B

Braven BRV-1 ultra rugged Bluetooth speaker

Panasonic Lumix DMX-ZS30

Able Planet Clear Harmony NC1050 noise cancellation headphones

RHA MA450i noise isolating earphones with remote and mic

MacBook Pro with Retina Display

Phosphor World e-Ink Watch

Nexus 7 Tablet

Dell XPS 13 Ultrabook

OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion

Bento 4 for iPad

Nokia Lumia 610

Sony Xperia Ion 

Toshiba Excite 7.7-inch tablet

BlackBerry PlayBook 4G-LTE

Motorola RAZR V

Motorola Atrix HD

Sandisk 64GB Extreme USB Flash Drive

Apple iPad (2012)

ioSafe SoloPro Disaster Proof hard drive

Cygnett Apollo Hybrid iPhone 4 case

Dell XPS 14Z Notebook

OlloClip Quick Connect Lens for iPhone 4

Kogeto dot 360' iPhone lens

FujiFilm X10 Camera

ClamCase Keyboard Case for iPad 2 

Toshiba Satellite Z830 Ultrabook

Nikon CoolPix S1200pj camera

Evolution Robotics Mint Plus Robot Cleaner

Acer S3 Ultrabook 

Freehand Powerstretch 5 Gloves

Kobo Vox Reader

Sony NEX-7 camera

Freehand Powerstretch 5 gloves

Toshiba Satellite Z830 Ultrabook

Acer S3 Ultrabook

Mint Plus Robotic Cleaner

Samsung Galaxy Nexus

HTC Raider

HTC Jetstream Tablet with LTE

LG Optimus LTE smartphone

Panasonic Lumix GF3 M43 Camera

Sandisk Memory Vault 16GB

Forza Motorsport 4

GarageBand for iPhone/iPod

Apple iPhone 4S

Olympus E-PL3 Micro Four Thirds camera

Nokia X7 Symbian Smartphone

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Monday
Aug152011

Review: Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 4G (TELUS)

By Gadjo Cardenas Sevilla

The much awaited Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1, which is expected to sell in Canada in both WiFi only and WiFi + 4G models in a few weeks,  represents Samsung’s very serious attempt to dominate the Android tablet space and even challenge the current tablet leader, Apple’s iPad 2.

 

We had a chance to spend time with a pre-production 16GB Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 device that also featured 4G connectivity on Telus. We were delighted to find out the device was way lighter and thinner than we had expected.

The design is a departure from Samsung's first 7-inch Galaxy Tab which shipped last year. The Tab 7 took a lot of its design and functionality from their smartphones.

With the Tab 10.1, Samsung is clearly playing to the slate form factor and as a result we get a very thin and light device that's easy to carry and ideal for on-the-go use specially the 4G version.

As far as the right weight and feel, Samsung got it right with the Tab 10.1 as it clearly leapfrogs most of the designs of its current competitors running the Google Android OS but at the expense of expansion ports.

the Tab 10.1 has stereo speakers

Samsung has really outdone itself with the Tab 10.1 in terms of how thin and light it is. At .33 inches thin and at 1.24 lbs. it is a wisp thinner and lighter than the iPad 2’s 0.34-inch thinness and 1.33 lbs. but it is a difference one can easily feel. The rounded edges, the thickness of the bezel and the silver plastic painted to look like aluminum do remind us of the iPad 2.

The Galaxy Tab 10.1 is light and easy to hold. The all-plastic back of the device is less slippery than the aluminum used in the iPad 2 and the Motorola XOOM, so it is slightly easier to hold with one hand which makes it more ideal for reading eBooks, websites and PDF's.

In terms of materials, plastic seems to work well for a tablet that's loaded with radios for WiFi, Bluetooth and in the case of our demo unit, 4G data. The white plastic glossy finish seems to be quite resilient to scratches and smudges can rarely be seen.

It would have been nice to see Samsung employ Duralumin alloy, the same type of material typically used for advanced aircrafts, and used in Samsung's Series 9 notebooks, in the tablet family as well but this would have brought up price as well as made the Tab 10.1 heavier.

 

 The Tab 10.1's size is also perfect for comic books and graphic novels and with the right .CBR (Comic Book Reader) software, enthusiasts will be able to carry thousands of issues in a slim device.

 

Video playback was also quite good on the Galaxy Tab; even non-HD YouTube videos looked pleasant. The stereo speakers, which are neatly hidden in the edges of the device, are surprisingly loud and clear. The 1280 x 800 pixel TFT screen is one of the better ones in the market today and feature a wide videwing angle, great colour depth and clarity even when using the lowest brightness settings.

The Galaxy Tab 10.1 may seem to lack I/O ports for HDMI-out and microUSB, but it does have a proprietary 30-pin port that can be used to attach any variety of connectors (which need to be purchased separately). This is reminiscent of how Apple allows devices to connect to the iPad by using an optional and regulated proprietary connector. 

We're not fans of this approach but there may be a good reason for it in terms of design. In order for Samsung to ensure the thinnest possible profile for the device, they had to choose to use a proprietary connector.

The requisite Samsung Social, Music and Reader Hubs, along with Samsung's own app store, make up the curated content specific to this device. Samsung has also enabled a neat gesture based zoom feature for when users are reading content. 

When activated, simply tilt the Tab 10.1 back and forth to zoom in and out of any website or document before you. It's a gimmicky feature but one that will be convenient in specific situations when users want to check out detail on a document without having to press on any buttons.

The Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 has all the features of what could be the most successful Honeycomb tablet yet. Its size and weight make it one of the more mobile yet feature-packed 10-inch tablets in the market today; and quite possibly the best equipped to take on Apple's iPad juggernaut.

One thing where it might need some adjustment is the price. There are a number of similarly specced 10.1 inch tablets in the market now staring at $399 and many of these may be chunkier but do everything the Tab 10.1 can do and some have even more ports and connectivity out of the box. Consumers will need to decided if they will pay an extra $100 for a slimmer and ligther tablet that's 80 per cent identical in functionality to the competition.

 

 

We found the Tab 10.1 to be reasonably fast on the TELUS network and were pleased with the performance while accessing email and the web in a moving vehicle. The speed of accessing websites was much faster than what we experienced on the Tab 7 inch on Rogers 3G network and a sign of how our data networks have evolved in a year.

In terms of performance, our pre-production demo model was slightly slower than our 32GB Motorola XOOM in accessing websites but on some ocassions it was just a fast.

The difference is hardly noticeable. We're expecting the shipping version to be updated and possibly faster than existing Android tablets since it will likely run a newer version of the Honeycomb OS.

The Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 is an impressive, highly portable and fun to use device that blends the best of Google's emerging Android OS with Samsung's own functionality and innovation. 

Rating 4.5 out of 5

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